The Jodrell Bank Observatory is a very special place. It is one of the most significant places, worldwide, that played a role in the development of the new science of Radio Astronomy and in 2019 it was awarded UNESCO World Heritage Site status in recognition of its global significance.

2020 marks 75 years since Sir Bernard Lovell first began scanning the skies from Jodrell Bank and we’re working on our brand new First Light Project, a stunning building in which we can begin to engage the public with the pioneering history of this incredible site.

It’s that time of year again, where we get to say #ThanksToYou as a national lottery player! From 5 – 13 June, we will be taking part in National Lottery Open Week by offering a FREE  hot drink in our Planet Café to all of our visitors who play the National Lottery.

We have a long history of recycling and sustainable construction here at Jodrell Bank. Although in the early days this wasn’t a conscious ethical choice as it is today, but the only way of getting anything built. A post-war necessity to make do and mend.

11 April, 2021

On This Day… 2011

On 11th April 2021, the Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre celebrates its 10th birthday.

5th – 14th March is British Science Week and we’re celebrating with 10 days of Science! From stargazing and climate science to the inspirational stories of Jodrell Bank. Celebrate and explore with us…

Since the momentous concrete pour that created the unique domed roof took place in October last year, the First Light Pavilion has really started to take shape and we’re delighted to be able to share some of the first images from inside.

The first scientific experiment at Jodrell Bank took place 75 years ago; from an army radar trailer, on a damp and icy Friday afternoon on the 14th December 1945.

We’re thrilled to announce today that we have received £125,600 from the Culture Recovery Fund to support us through the impact of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

A major construction milestone was reached last week as our new First Light Pavilion saw its impressive concrete dome roof installed.

Meteor showers, and in particular the August Perseids, have a special place in the history of Jodrell Bank. The 1946 shower marked the start of Jodrell Bank becoming an astronomical observatory, and Bernard Lovell becoming an astronomer.

Sir Bernard Lovell’s ‘giant paraboloid’ was originally proposed in 1951 and complete by 1957. Why did it take so long to build?