Half Term has arrived and our outdoor areas are open all week long for families to explore and enjoy.

A major construction milestone was reached last week as our new First Light Pavilion saw its impressive concrete dome roof installed.

Meteor showers, and in particular the August Perseids, have a special place in the history of Jodrell Bank. The 1946 shower marked the start of Jodrell Bank becoming an astronomical observatory, and Bernard Lovell becoming an astronomer.

21 July, 2020

Comet NEOWISE

Look out for comet NEOWISE in the northwest sky after dusk. The comet will reach its closest point to Earth this week, 23rd July when it will be 64 million miles (103 million km) away.

The impressive new First Light Pavilion is being built by Kier Construction who have written a guest blog for us about their recent ‘virtual careers fair’…

Sir Bernard Lovell’s ‘giant paraboloid’ was originally proposed in 1951 and complete by 1957. Why did it take so long to build?

New research published by UNESCO UK this week, shows that UNESCO projects can help build a greener, more equal and more peaceful world, while also creating financial value.

This week marks Volunteers Week and we want to send a huge thank you to all the volunteers and voluntary organisations that support us here at Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre. 

The iconic Jodrell Bank Observatory at The University of Manchester is taking its first major steps to resume scientific operations after lockdown as part of what is probably the biggest ‘reboot’ in astrophysics!

Lovell wartime distinction is less well known that his work in radio astronomy, but as the UK celebrates VE Day, we’re highlighting Lovell’s work developing the H2S airborne radar system, which greatly improved the Royal Air Force’s bombing accuracy and proved decisive in the outcome of the second world war.