This section brings together posts on recent (and sometimes past) science at Jodrell Bank and elsewhere. Where we can, we try to give links to the bloggers themselves so you can follow their work in future. Many of them work here, many work on our University Main Campus in Manchester and some of them are national and international collaborators.

“Our mission is to inspire the scientists of the future” The University of Manchester’s Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre welcomes over 150,000 visitors each year to the famous Cheshire scientific facility, 21,000 of whom are school pupils on educational visits. “Our mission is to inspire the scientists of the future”, said Professor Teresa Anderson, Director of […]

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Today (23:06:15) is National Women in Engineering Day – a good day on which to write about our most recent ‘Girls Night Out’ at Jodrell Bank – which focused on the engineering of the Square Kilometre Array. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world’s largest telescope – an array made up of thousands […]

30 July, 2015

Once in a Blue Moon

31 July 2015 is a special day. There will be a full Moon, which in itself is not unusual. But it will be the second full Moon this July, and this is rare. The second full Moon in a single calendar month is traditionally called a ‘Blue Moon’. A second full Moon in one calendar […]

14 April, 2015

Dark Matter

A group of us at the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics are members of a large international collaboration called the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The goal of DES is to study the unexplained acceleration of the universe nicknamed “Dark Energy”.  We’re doing this with one of the largest sky surveys that’s ever been made, which […]

  On Friday 20th March, the UK will be witness to a rare and beautiful astronomical event – a solar eclipse. Starting at around 8.30am (the exact times vary by a few minutes around the country) the Moon will slowly begin moving in front of the Sun, reaching maximum coverage by about 9.30am. Seen from […]

This incredible image released today by the ALMA Observatory, is our best ever view of the formation of planets. I think it deserves to sit alongside images like the Hubble Deep Field and the Cosmic Microwave Background as one of the classic astronomy photos. What we see here is the disc of gas and dust […]